Jan 22, 2020 3:50 PM

Wichita police chief appointed to national commission on law enforcement

Posted Jan 22, 2020 3:50 PM
Wichita police chief Gordon Ramsay (third from right) during Wednesday's ceremony -photo courtesy U.S. Department of Justice
Wichita police chief Gordon Ramsay (third from right) during Wednesday's ceremony -photo courtesy U.S. Department of Justice

WASHINGTON -- During a ceremony Wednesday in Washington, D.C., Wichita Police Chief Gordon Ramsay was appointed by Attorney General William P. Barr to the Presidential Commission on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice, according to a media release from WPD.

On October 28, 2019, President Donald J. Trump signed Executive Order No. 13896, authorizing and designating the Attorney General to create such a Commission that would explore modern issues affecting law enforcement that most impact the ability of American policing to reduce crime. The launch of the Commission was announced at today’s ceremony as well.

“There is no more noble and important profession than law enforcement. A free and safe society requires a trusted and capable police force to safeguard our rights to life and liberty,” said Attorney General William P. Barr. “But as criminal threats and social conditions have changed the responsibilities and roles of police officers, there is a need for a modern study of how law enforcement can best protect and serve American communities.  This is why the President instructed me to establish this critical Commission, whose members truly reflect the best there is in law enforcement. Together, we will examine, discuss, and debate how justice is administered in the United States and uncover opportunities for progress, improvement, and innovation.”

 “It is an honor to have been chosen to serve on this Presidential Commission,” Chief Gordon Ramsay said.  “I am looking forward to working with the other chosen criminal justice experts in examining how to effectively reduce crime and addressing social factors that contribute to crime.  My goal is to not only help nationwide but also to bring the ideas back to Wichita and make it a safer community.”

The Executive Order instructs the Commission to conduct its study by focusing on the law enforcement officers who are tasked with reducing crime on a daily basis. It also directs the Commission to research “important current issues facing law enforcement and the criminal justice system,” and recommends a variety of subjects for study, such as, but not limited to:

·         The challenges to law enforcement associated with mental illness, homelessness, substance abuse, and other social factors that influence crime and strain criminal justice resources;

·         The recruitment, hiring, training, and retention of law enforcement officers, including in rural and tribal communities;

·         Refusals by State and local prosecutors to enforce laws or prosecute categories of crimes;

·         The need to promote public confidence and respect for the law and law enforcement officers; and

·         The effects of technological innovations on law enforcement and the criminal justice system, including the challenges and opportunities presented by such innovations.

The Commission will principally conduct its study through a series of hearings, panel presentations, field visits, and other public meetings. At these events, the Commission will hear from subject matter experts, public officials, private citizens, and other relevant stakeholders and institutions who can provide valuable insight into these issues.

The Commissioners, appointed by the Attorney General and announced today, are urban police chiefs, state prosecutors, county sheriffs, members of rural and tribal law enforcement, federal agents, U.S. Attorneys, and a state attorney general. In addition to their diverse experiences and backgrounds, each member brings to the Commission an expertise in formulating and shaping law enforcement policy and leading police departments and law enforcement organizations.

The Commission will meet monthly for the next year and then report its findings to the Attorney General, who will submit a final report to the President.

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Jan 22, 2020 3:50 PM
Social media tip leads to Kan. woman's arrest for counterfeit cash, drugs
Lopez photo Cowley Co.

COWLEY COUNTY—Law enforcement authorities are investigating a Kansas woman on drug and additional charges after a tip on social media.

On December 28, police took a report regarding a theft by shoplifting that had occurred earlier that day at the Walmart Supercenter, located at 2701 N. Summit Street in Arkansas City, according to a media release.

Through an anonymous tip via social media, Reyna Maria, 33, was identified as a possible suspect in the case.

On January 20, police located Lopez at a residence in the 200 block of East Birch Avenue after locating a vehicle belonging to her in that neighborhood. The vehicle, a gold 2000 Dodge Stratus, contained drug paraphernalia within plain sight of officers.

After they gained consent to search the vehicle, police also located counterfeit money inside. Police arrested her on requested charges that include felony of possession of methamphetamine and two felony counts of counterfeiting currency as well as one misdemeanor count each of possession of drug paraphernalia and theft.

She was transported to and booked into the Cowley County Jail in Winfield in lieu of $9,500 bond, according to the release.