Nov 29, 2019 4:24 PM

FDA: Two flour producers issue recalls

Posted Nov 29, 2019 4:24 PM

Two flour producers have issued voluntary national recalls of their products because of the potential presence of E. coli.


According to information from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), both UNFI and Hodgson Mill have announced voluntary recalls on Wednesday. The following information was provided by the FDA.


Images provided by FDA


UNFI recall


UNFI announced Wednesday a voluntary national recall of five-pound bags of its Wild Harvest® Organic All-Purpose Flour, Unbleached, with a Code of AA BEST IF USED BY 010820 CC 15:58 and UPC Code 711535509158. The recall is being issued for the potential presence of E. coli. During routine FDA sampling of the five-pound bag product, results were found to be positive for E.coli.


E. coli can cause serious and sometimes life-threatening infections in infants, older people, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems. The most common symptoms of E. coli are diarrhea, abdominal cramps, nausea and vomiting, which develop within three or four days of eating contaminated food. The illness usually lasts about a week and most people recover without treatment. Guidance from FDA and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) continues to warn that consumers should refrain from consuming any raw products made with flour and that all surfaces, hands and utensils should be properly cleaned after contact with flour or dough.


To date, UNFI has not received any direct consumer reports of confirmed illnesses related to this product. This recall is being issued out of an abundance of care.


This recall only affects the following code date of Wild Harvest® Organic All-Purpose Flour, Unbleached five-pound bags currently in stores or consumers’ pantries. No other types of Wild Harvest® Flour are affected by this recall.


Wild Harvest® Organic All-Purpose Flour, Unbleached Package UPC: 711535509158 Best if Used by Date: 010820 CC 15:58.


Consumers are asked to check their pantries and dispose of the product affected by this recall. Consumers with questions may contact UNFI at 855-423-2630 (customer support is available seven days-a-week between 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM CST). Any consumers concerned about an illness should contact a physician.



Hodgson Mill recall


Hodgson Mill of Effingham, Ill., announced Wednesday a voluntary national recall of specific lots of its Unbleached All-Purpose White Wheat Flour (5 lb.)


We are taking this voluntary precautionary step because of the potential presence of pathogenic E. coli which was discovered through sampling raw uncooked flour. Hodgson Mill has not received any confirmed reports of illnesses related to this product.


The only product affected by this voluntary recall is:


Unbleached All-Purpose White Wheat Flour (5 lb.) UPC 0-71518-05009-2


Best By Date 10-01-2020 and 10-02-2020 with lot codes listed Lot# 001042 & 005517


Use By and Lot Code information can be found on the bottom back panel of the 5 lb. Bag. Used By date and Lot Code, along with their location on the bag, must all match in order to represent flour affected by this recall.


Consumer safety is our top priority. Hodgson Mill package states "do not eat raw flour, dough or batter". The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) warns consumers to not consume raw flour or uncooked raw dough.


E. coli is killed by heat through baking, frying, sautéing, or boiling products made with flour. For more information, refer to the following: https://www.cdc.gov/features/no-raw-dough/index.html. Symptoms of pathogenic E. coli illness include acute, often bloody diarrheal illness and abdominal cramps. Most people recover within a week. However, children, the elderly, and immunosuppressed individuals may develop hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a severe illness which may cause the kidneys to fail.


Consumers are reminded to wash their hands, work surfaces, and utensils thoroughly after contact with raw dough products or flour, and to never eat raw dough or batter.


This lot of flour was milled at an ADM Milling Facility in St Louis, Mo., and repacked at Hodgson Mill, Inc. facility in Effingham, Ill., and was distributed by Hodgson Mill through retailers and distribution nationwide and sold through our website www.hodgsonmill.com.


Consumers who have purchased 5 pound packages of Unbleached All-Purpose White Wheat Flour with specific lot codes are urged to stop using the product immediately and return them to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company customer service M-F 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 1-888-417-9343 x 1.


Any consumers concerned about an illness should contact a physician.


Bakers have trusted Hodgson Mill flour products in their kitchens for many years and because of that trust we have issued this voluntary recall. We remain committed to providing our consumers safe and superior products.

Continue Reading Hutch Post
Nov 29, 2019 4:24 PM
Months of flooding killed Kansas' trees and state park tourism

Heavy rains this spring led to widespread flooding in Kansas. Chris Neal / For the Kansas News Service


By BRIAN GRIMMETT

Kansas News Service


The Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism stands to lose millions of dollars after record spring rains led to park closures, property damage and washed-out roads.


In most of Kansas, the rain started in early spring and didn’t stop until the end of June. High water levels at reservoirs (where most state parks are located) inundated campgrounds, boat docks and roads.


“We’re not talking about for a week.” Parks Director Linda Lanterman said. “We’re talking six weeks, eight weeks ... so the damage is significant until you can get that water down.”


The timing couldn’t have been worse for Kansas state parks, which depend upon revenue during what Lanterman calls the “Million-Dollar Months” — May, June, July and August — to stay afloat for the rest of the year.


But state parks failed to reach $1 million in each of those months this year. In May, the parks brought in $981,586 compared with $1,065,033 in 2018. The dropoff was even more severe in June, when revenue was $568,743 compared with $1,563,780 in 2018.


Understanding how important these months were, several parks managers tried to stay open until campgrounds were inaccessible. Lanterman said she had to tell a few parks they had to close earlier before floodwaters made it impossible to remove cabins and other equipment.


While parts of a few state parks in eastern Kansas (Perry and Milford) are still flooded, preventing the department from fully assessing the damage, most opened up by mid-July. With the rains gone, the park system made more than $1 million in both July and August from boaters and campers.


“Who would have guessed?” Lanterman said. “Not me.”


But there’s still the issue of repairing damage: Floodwaters have cracked boat docks, washed away gravel from roads, filled restrooms with silt and removed chunks of land underneath concrete campsites and picnic table pads.


The flooding is also going to kill a lot of trees in the state parks.


Dozens of acres of trees have been underwater for months, which means the roots aren’t able to get the oxygen they need.


“We can see clearly they are starting to decline and go downhill,” said Ryan Armbrust, a state forest health specialist with the Kansas Forest Service.


When trees die, especially at this scale, it can have a major impact on the local ecosystem. Armbrust said trees provide shade and homes for animals, and also reduce air pollution. That won’t come back until the next generation of trees.


He’s also worried about what will grow back in place of the lost trees.


“What forest regrows in that area may not necessarily be as functional or as high-quality as what was there before,” he said.


Instead of oak and hickory regrowing (those higher- quality trees), it might be a lot of elms or hackberry. At worst, invasive species such as bush honeysuckle will take advantage of the opportunity to spread, Armbrust said.


It’s not just trees around rivers and lakes either. Armbrust said he expects to get plenty of calls next spring from people with windbreaks on their property, wondering why they don’t look so good.


“Even though the month of May is obviously behind us,” Armbrust said. “We’re still going to be having impacts from that flood event for some time.”


Brian Grimmett reports on the environment, energy and natural resources for KMUW in Wichita and the Kansas News Service. You can follow him on Twitter @briangrimmett or email him at [email protected] The Kansas News Service is a collaboration of KCUR, Kansas Public Radio, KMUW and High Plains Public Radio focused on the health and well-being of Kansans, their communities and civic life.